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Sleep and skin health.

Sleep and skin health.

July 25, 2021 2 min read


Good quality, restorative sleep is also crucial for the nightly cellular repair, regeneration and immune function. Every night, we go through repeated cycles of two distinctly different sleep phases: Rapid Eye Movement (REM, when the most active dreaming happens) and non-REM sleep (NREM, the deeper sleep). During NREM, blood flow is directed from our brain and body core, more towards the body’s periphery including the skin. Thus, a restorative hormone flow is established, and cellular repair is enhanced.

Sleep deprivation on the other hand is known to contribute to systemic inflammation, even after a short period of only a couple of weeks, as research has shown. In fact, sleep deprivation is thought to increase all sorts of age-related processes as well as chronic health problems.

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Should you be taking a collagen supplement?

Should you be taking a collagen supplement?

July 25, 2021 4 min read

Collagen. It’s one of the essential building blocks of healthy skin and many other parts of the body like our hair, nails, and bones. It gives our skin its structure, strength and elasticity, and that’s what forms the scaffolding of the skin – the supportive base that provides us with the lift we need for a plump, vibrant complexion.
Unfortunately, however, optimum levels don’t last, and once we hit 25, production starts to slow down – inducing a loss of elasticity, firmness and luminosity. When collagen breakdown begins, the skin gradually loses that scaffolding, and it starts to look frail and collapses more easily into folds. While we can’t prevent these changes, there are things that we can do to slow them down. 
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Why Profhilo Will Always Have a Place in my Clinic.

Why Profhilo Will Always Have a Place in my Clinic.

July 25, 2021 3 min read

When it comes to stimulating collagen and improving the overall skin texture of the face and neck, there isn’t much that compares to Profhilo . It’s a relatively new, non-invasive treatment in the world of aesthetics, but since its release in 2015, it’s managed to cause quite a stir with clients and practitioners alike – promising to deliver a smoother, more supple and radiant complexion.

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Vitamin C is a highly regarded skincare ingredient.

Vitamin C is a highly regarded skincare ingredient.

July 25, 2021 2 min read

Vitamin C has several essential roles in skincare. It’s an antioxidant, skin brightening agent and anti-inflammatory, and is also required for the synthesis of collagen, which gives our skin its youthful firmness and support structure. It’s safe to say that Vitamin C is the gold standard of skincare ingredients, especially when it comes to supporting the skin through the ageing process.
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Why You Need Vitamin C and Retinol in Your Skin Care Routine

Why You Need Vitamin C and Retinol in Your Skin Care Routine

July 25, 2021 3 min read

To reduce the appearance of wrinkles, fine lines and other signs of ageing, vitamin C and retinol are two key ingredients to keep in your arsenal. Vitamin C is known for its brightening benefits, while retinol boosts cell turnover. Using both ingredients in your skin-care routine will help you achieve a radiant and youthful complexion.


The Benefits of Vitamin C.


L-ascorbic acid, or pure vitamin C, is a powerful antioxidant that is one of the best ingredients for targeting signs of ageing, according to industry experts. Much of that has to do with its role in neutralising free radicals. Triggered by various environmental factors such as pollution, smoke and UV rays, free radicals can break down your skin’s collagen and cause visible signs of ageing to form. This can include wrinkles, fine lines, dark spots, dry patches and more. Vitamin C is the only antioxidant proven to stimulate the synthesis of collagen and minimise fine lines and wrinkles.

 

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What  is Niacinamide and why is it one of The Skincare ingredients.

What is Niacinamide and why is it one of The Skincare ingredients.

July 25, 2021 2 min read

Niacinamide, which is part of the vitamin B3 compound, is an example of the latter. It’s notably less talked about than certain other ingredients such as Vitamin A, C and hyaluronic acid, yet it provides an array of benefits for the skin by helping to improve uneven skin tone, soften fine lines, boost radiance and minimise large pores, to name a few.

In recent years, new research has come to light demonstrating just how beneficial this ingredient is. But it’s not a new ingredient; it’s been in the skincare world for a very long time.
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Pigmentation - the story continues.

Pigmentation - the story continues.

July 25, 2021 3 min read

Hyperpigmentation is an umbrella term used to define common skin conditions — including post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH), melasma and sun spots — in which patches of skin become darker than the surrounding area. The darkening of the skin results from an excess in melanin — the natural pigment that determines skin, hair and eye colour — and frequently appears on the face, hands and other parts of the body regularly exposed to sunlight.
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Pigmentation

Pigmentation

July 24, 2021 2 min read

Hyperpigmentation is defined as darkening patches of skin. This occurs when the skin produces more melanin, the pigment that gives skin its colour. Sun damage is the main cause of pigmentation. The initial melanin production from sun exposure acts as a natural sun screen to protect from harmful rays. However excess UVA/UVB exposure disrupts the melanin production, which leads to increased pigmentation. 
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Human Skin -Microbiome and Acne.

Human Skin -Microbiome and Acne.

June 08, 2021 3 min read

Research in to microbiomes of the human body , to include skin and gut tell us that a diverse and physiologically important array of bacteria, viruses, fungi and archaea make their home on the skin. Typically, a person has around 1,000 species of bacteria on their skin. And, as might be expected from such a large area — roughly two square metres for an average adult — the skin offers a variety of distinct ecosystems, which create conditions that favour different subsets of organisms. We harbour roughly the same number of microbes as we have cells. This complex ecosystem is crucial to our health, affecting many processes including immunity, child development and bone density regulation. Research in this area has been extensive, with exciting work on how the microbiome develops, its influence on brain and behaviour and implications in both contributing to and treating various disorders.

A person’s gut microbiome is seeded in early life according to the bacteria they are exposed to and how successfully these microbes colonise the intestines.
Populations of bacteria in the gut are highly sensitive to the food we eat, so sensitive, in fact, that changes in species variation and gene expression appear within three or four days following a major sift in diet.
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Retinol

Retinol

May 31, 2021 2 min read

Retinol is a derivative of vitamin A; retinol is widely considered as the holy grail of anti- ageing ingredients. The umbrella of retinoids all fall within the same category of vitamin A derivatives and can be classified (for the most part) under the four core categories: retinyl esters, retinol, retinaldehyde, and retinoic acid. Retinol, tazarotene, retinoic acid, adapalene, pure retinol. All of these forms of retinoids seek to activate the three retinoic acid receptors (alpha, beta, gamma), each of which plays a different role in vital skin processes and behaviours, ranging from exfoliation, oil production, cell turnover, pigmentation, and collagen production. By increasing the rate of cell turnover in the skin, studies have shown it to be responsible for aiding just about any skin concern, from fine lines to pigmentation and even acne.
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Sun Protection is essential.

Sun Protection is essential.

May 30, 2021 1 min read

Most skin cancer is caused by UV exposure. At least 50% of sun damage occurs under the age of ten. Kids under the age of one, should not be exposed to sun light, nor should they have SPF applied to their skin. Kids have thinner, more sensitive skin, making it essential for parents to develop good sun-protection habits from the get-go. Their skin barrier while properly formed at birth is different to that of an adult. As infant skin continues to mature through the first years of life, it is important that skin care products are formulated appropriately.

 

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Sunscreen Can help to protect against Skin Cancer

Sunscreen Can help to protect against Skin Cancer

May 23, 2021 2 min read

Before understanding the consequences of skipping sunscreen, it is important to note how UV radiation works and affects the skin. UV radiation ranges from a wavelength of 100 to 400 nanometres. UVA and UVB rays are somewhere in the 300 to 400 range. UV radiation is divided into 3 main groups:
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